Critical Care

Jul 152011
 

3% saline infusions have become standard care for increased intracranial pressure at many centers, based on mostly anecdotal evidence. Hauer et al looked retrospectively at 100 patients receiving 3% saline for severe stroke in 2008-2009 (intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or ischemic) and compared them to 115 historical controls, 2007-2008 with “equal” underlying disease. Hypertonic saline [… read more]

Jul 142011
 

Tranexamic acid has a small beneficial effect on hemorrhage from trauma or surgery. Among 270 subjects with intracranial hemorrhage due to trauma, those randomized to tranexamic acid showed a trend toward improved outcomes (mortality, hemorrhage extension, new bleeding foci) compared to placebo. Authors propose a large trial to explore further. BMJ 2011;343:d3795. FREE FULL TEXT

Jun 262011
 

The best approach to nutrition during critical illness is unknown. Casaer et al randomized 4,640 critically-ill patients who could not get enough calories by enteral feeding to receive TPN either on ICU day 3, or to wait until ICU day 8. While waiting for their TPN in the late group, patients got calories in sugar [… read more]

Jun 192011
 

Masclans et al followed 38 patients with ARDS in 3 ICUs for 6 months. Health-related quality of life (Nottingham Test Profile) was lower than expected at 6 months, with 40% reporting limitations in daily activities mainly due to low energy, mobility and social functioning. Mild radiographic abnormalities and restrictive physiology were usually present on HRCT [… read more]

Jun 142011
 

Gershengorn et al retrospectively compared two MICUs at Beth Israel: one with “midlevels” (nurse practitioners and physician assistants during the day with attending coverage overnight) and one that was all house staff 24/7. There were no differences in important outcomes (mortality, MICU or hospital LOS), although the study was nonrandomized and subject to bias. CHEST [… read more]

Jun 122011
 

Pileggi et al analyzed 28 studies and concluded that decontaminating the GI/respiratory tract with antiseptics reduced ventilator-associated pneumonia by 27%; decontamination with antibiotics reduced VAP by 36%. Antibiotic decontamination also reduced ICU infections in general, by 29%. Critical Care 2011;15:R155. FREE FULL TEXT Also see last month’s “Oral / gastric antibiotic decontamination reduced bacteremias in [… read more]