Oct 262012
 
Vitamin D is for "doesn't do diddly" for the common cold (RCT)

Extra Vitamin D Doesn’t Prevent Colds in Healthy Adults (JAMA) It looks like you can add Vitamin D to list of supplements (echinacea, vitamin C, etc.) who’ve gone up against the common cold and lost. (Scorekeepers will note that zinc held its own, though, in a Cochrane analysis.) Vitamin D plays an important role in immune responses, [… read more]

Oct 192012
 
"Practice ischemia" on an arm reduces contrast nephropathy after procedures (RCT)

Contrast-induced nephropathy (kidney damage) is a serious problem that can occur after many medical tests and procedures, but coronary angiography (cardiac catheterization) is the main culprit. People with pre-existing renal disease are most susceptible to contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) — about 1 in 8 of them develop a “bump” in creatinine of >0.5 mg/dL after cardiac [… read more]

Oct 042012
 
Post-pyloric feeding no better than usual NG tube in vented patients (RCT)

Image: EIMJM.com Evidence-based practice guidelines adopted by critical care societies in Canada, Germany, Australia and New Zealand recommend starting enteral nutrition for critical illness shortly after admission to an ICU. In observational studies, critically ill adults get only about 50-70% their caloric goals from enteral feeding; reduced gastric motility is often responsible for the limited [… read more]

Sep 302012
 
Treatment of Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) of the Arm (Review/Guideline)

The content previously here was removed at the request of the American College of Chest Physicians. For the ACCP 9th edition clinical practice guidelines for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE), please visit the ACCP website. PulmCCM is not affiliated with ACCP or Chest.

Sep 202012
 
Gabapentin improved chronic cough in randomized trial

Chronic cough is the scourge both of the coughers themselves, and the doctors who treat them. Although rarely medically serious, chronic cough can be surprisingly debilitating by disrupting sufferers’ social and professional lives. Doctors, for their part, often feel frustrated and powerless in treating chronic cough. Although gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), asthma, ACE inhibitor use, [… read more]

Sep 162012
 
Initial Treatment of Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT) of the Leg (Guidelines)

The content previously here was removed at the request of the American College of Chest Physicians. For the ACCP 9th edition clinical practice guidelines for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE), please visit the ACCP website. PulmCCM is not affiliated with ACCP or Chest.

Sep 122012
 
Anemia in the ICU (Review)

Anemia in the ICU: Review and Update (More PulmCCM Topic Updates) This document will be updated periodically to incorporate new research findings. To suggest an article for inclusion, please comment below. Anemia is almost inevitable during many episodes of critical illness, and has been associated with worsened outcomes and prognosis. However, the preponderance of evidence suggests that correcting anemia [… read more]

Sep 042012
 
Hyperosmolar Therapy for Increased Intracranial Pressure (Review)

Hypertonic Saline & Mannitol for Raised Intracranial Pressure (More PulmCCM Topic Updates) Acute brain injuries of all sorts increase the pressure inside the skull (intracranial pressure). Traumatic brain injury, bleeding in or around the brain, severe ischemic stroke, and acute hepatic failure all raise intracranial pressure, and increased intracranial pressure often becomes the most severe [… read more]

Sep 022012
 

Definition of Severe Sepsis by the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines Severe sepsis is sepsis (known or suspected infection with systemic manifestations of sepsis) along with sepsis-related tissue hypoperfusion or organ dysfunction. Organ dysfunction or tissue hypoperfusion are defined by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign as any of the below signs or findings: Signs of Severe Sepsis: Organ [… read more]

Aug 302012
 
From the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines: Criteria for diagnosis of sepsis

Surviving Sepsis Guidelines’ Criteria for Sepsis Diagnosis See all the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines According to the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines, a sepsis diagnosis requires the presence of infection, which can be proven or suspected, and 2 or more of the following criteria: Hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mm Hg or fallen by >40 from baseline, [… read more]

Aug 212012
 
Singulair (montelukast) goes generic (FDA)

The FDA announced earlier this month that it granted approval to 10 generic manufacturers to produce and market generic forms of montelukast, sold by Merck since its approval in 1998 as Singulair. Brand-name Singulair currently costs about $168 per month, so cost competition could bring considerable savings to those taking the medication (and their insurance [… read more]

Aug 172012
 
Advanced bronchoscopy yields are 70% in meta-analysis (Review)

(image: Wikipedia) As one after another specialty society endorses routine lung cancer screening with chest CT scans, we all know a Nodule Storm is coming to a pulmonology clinic near you. Thankfully, smart people are asking how we can systematically and successfully handle this soon-to-be-common outpatient clinical problem. Most of these many thousands of nodules [… read more]

Aug 152012
 
Assess the IVC for fluid responsiveness with ultrasound (EMCrit Video)

Have you seen EMCrit.org? It’s the brainchild of Scott Weingart, an ED intensivist in New York City. ED docs like to do things (not just debate and deconstruct them endlessly like us pulmonologist-intensivists). In that spirit, Scott’s site is in my opinion more practical, “virtual-hands-on,” and skills/procedure-based than PulmCCM.org. Here’s a great example — his [… read more]

Aug 112012
 
Intubation & Airway Management Review (LITFL)

When it comes to airway management skills, muscle memory rules, and there’s no substitute for hands-on experience. But in between intubations and endotracheal tube changes, what’s the best way to bolster your skills and knowledge base? Reading textbooks and journal articles provides truthful information, but I suspect it gets filed away and stashed in your [… read more]

Aug 082012
 
CPAP gives the heart a tune-up for 1 year or 30 million beats, whichever comes first

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) might be the perfect disease to describe the American health care system. The condition is overwhelmingly due to our over-indulgence and under-activity; its expensive diagnosis (polysomnography) and best treatment (CPAP) help physicians and device manufacturers prosper while consternating those who pay (the government and insurance companies), who then threaten to cut off [… read more]

Aug 032012
 
Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment (Update/Review)

Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) This review document is periodically updated and reposted as new information is published. Please comment below with your suggestions for inclusion in upcoming updates of this review. (More PulmCCM topic reviews) The diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is rapidly evolving, [… read more]

Aug 022012
 
How many times has giving empiric antibiotics saved your professional behind?

Physicians who liberally prescribe empiric antibiotics are often maligned as irresponsible or unthinking by condescending colleagues and policy wonks. But are these doctors actually courageous and prudent, saving countless lives every year by refusing to bend to misguided pressure from antibiotic-conserving paper-pushers? As antibiotic resistance has emerged, many hospitals have begun requiring physicians to provide [… read more]