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Jul 052013
 
In COPD exacerbations, 5 days steroids seem as good as 14 (REDUCE trial)

For COPD Exacerbations, 5 Days Corticosteroids As Good as 2+ Weeks COPD exacerbations — worsening of shortness of breath and cough, often requiring medical treatment — are a major problem for many people living with COPD. People with moderate or severe emphysema and chronic bronchitis (together called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) experience an average of [… read more]

Jul 042013
 
Many people with metastatic lung cancer think radiation can cure

image: cancer.gov Patients With Metastatic Lung Cancer Often Believe Radiation Could Cure Among 384 patients with metastatic lung cancer who answered a survey, two in five expressed belief that radiation therapy was “very likely” or “somewhat likely” to cure them. Eighty percent thought radiation therapy would allow them to live longer, and only one-third admitted [… read more]

Jun 272013
 
Early tracheostomy does not improve survival or other outcomes (TracMan trial)

image: CUHK Early Tracheostomy Does Not Help in Large “TracMan” Trial More than 100,000 tracheostomies are performed worldwide each year for people requiring prolonged periods of mechanical ventilation. It’s generally agreed that to avoid damaging the trachea and throat, a tracheostomy should be placed within 3 weeks of mechanical ventilation. But prior to 3 weeks, [… read more]

Jun 262013
 
FDA warns against use of Hetastarch in ICU

U.S. FDA Advises Against Hetastarch Use in ICU European Agency Recommends Ban It was probably only a matter of time. In the wake of large randomized trials suggesting hydroxyethyl starches (HES or hetastarch) cause kidney injury and death in critically ill patients from sepsis and other causes, and the European Medicines Agency formally suggesting this month [… read more]

Jun 212013
 
In intracerebral hemorrhage, rapid blood pressure reductions were safe (INTERACT2)

image: Wikipedia Rapid Blood Pressure Control Doesn’t Hurt, May Help in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Strokes caused by intracerebral hemorrhage — sudden bleeding into the brain — are as devastating as they sound. Almost half of people with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) die within a month, and most of the survivors end up in nursing homes or needing [… read more]

Jun 212013
 
High-Altitude Illness: Prediction, Prevention, Treatment

Getting Sick at High Altitude: Prevention & Treatment Rapidly ascending above altitudes of 8,200 feet (2,500 meters) from lower elevations can result in illness ranging from mild nausea and headaches, to life-threatening edema of the lungs or brain. Truth is, there is little data to help physicians prevent or treat high-altitude illnesses, or to counsel [… read more]

Jun 162013
 
Decontaminate all incoming ICU patients to reduce infections, says RCT

“Decolonizing” New ICU Patients Reduces Bloodstream Infections: NEJM This article had an erratum posted in NEJM: read more here. In humankind’s battle against bacteria, the ICU is the front line. And with MRSA infection rates doubling in the past 5 years, and the more recent and scary spread of lethal pan-resistant Enterobacteriae, lately the bugs have [… read more]

Jun 162013
 
Ultrasound in the ICU: Hypotension after a cholecystectomy (Case 1)

Ultrasound Case 1 Hypotension after a Cholecystectomy: Why? From Philippe Rola and the Critical Care & Ultrasound Institute, the first in a series of educational ultrasound cases on PulmCCM: A 64 year-old male is admitted to the ICU from the surgical ward with hypotension, 3 days post-cholecystectomy. He is intubated for airway protection following loss [… read more]

Jun 162013
 

By Dr. Philippe Rola I was recently scanning the literature in preparation for our symposium, and came across what should have been a 2003 instead of a 2013 publication in the March issue of the CCM Journal, entitled “Point-of-Care Ultrasound to estimate Central Venous Pressure:  A Comparison of Three Techniques.” I have to admit this [… read more]

Jun 152013
 
Thanks to everyone for your help.

The PulmCCM “Wall of Fame” THANKS to all of you who supported PulmCCM during the successful campaign to raise funding for development of high-quality iPhone and Android mobile apps. I really appreciate each and every one of your help (in chronological order): Anonymous Manish Aggarwal Lewis Satterwhite Robert Deutsch Mehdi Shelhamer Manuel Figueroa Mark Bloore [… read more]

Jun 072013
 
Managing anticoagulation for surgery and invasive procedures (Review)

Managing Anticoagulation Therapy For Surgery and Procedures (NEJM) See also: How to manage anticoagulation perioperatively (ACCP Guidelines) NOTE: This is a summary of an article in a medical journal, provided as a service to physicians. It is not medical advice. No one should ever make changes to their anticoagulation treatment except under a physician’s supervision. [… read more]

Jun 072013
 
How safe is EBUS? Complication rates <1% at experienced centers

image: Olympus EBUS Complication Rates <1% at Experienced Centers Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) — an ultrasound probe on the tip of a bronchoscope — allows real-time viewing of tissues beyond the bronchial wall. It enables more accurate and safer needle biopsies of lymph nodes and masses that abut the bronchial wall. EBUS is an exciting new [… read more]

Jun 022013
 
A turn for the best? Prone positioning saves lives in ARDS trial

Prone Positioning Saves Lives in Severe ARDS Patients: NEJM It’s long been known that positioning patients with ARDS on mechanical ventilation face-down (prone) improves their oxygenation. (There are various theories why prone positioning helps, such as by reducing ARDS’s injurious heterogeneous alveolar overdistension.) The improved oxygen levels have never translated into improved outcomes in ARDS [… read more]

Jun 022013
 
How to prevent COPD exacerbations

How to Prevent Acute COPD Exacerbations Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are a major problem for many people living with COPD. Acute exacerbations or attacks occur more often in people with more severe COPD (about 1-2 per year), and these disease flares may either signal or cause a more rapid progression of [… read more]

May 252013
 
"Checking residuals" during tube feeding on mechanical ventilation: unnecessary?

image: Lighthouse Med. Equip. No Benefit Seen From Monitoring Gastric Volume in Ventilated Patients on Tube Feedings Early enteral nutrition for patients on mechanical ventilation is considered the standard of care. It’s been assumed that delayed gastric emptying, resulting in a stomach full of liquid nutrition, predisposes patients to have aspiration events and develop ventilator [… read more]

May 232013
 
New lung cancer prediction tool promises better use of screening CT

New Prediction Model Selects Best Lung Cancer Screening Candidates In the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), screening for lung cancer with low-dose chest CT scans resulted in a 20% reduction in death from lung cancer. The consumer-serving American Lung Association recommended outright that older people with heavy smoking histories should get lung cancer screening; leading [… read more]

May 202013
 
Staph vaccine fails in cardiothoracic surgery patients

Staph Vaccine Fails in Cardiothoracic Surgery Patients Staphyloccocus aureus wound infections and bacteremia commonly complicate cardiothoracic surgery, even with meticulous attention to infection prevention. Staph mediastinitis, a deep infection of the surgical wound, is particularly feared and lethal. Vance Fowler et al randomized 8,031 people undergoing sternotomy to receive the V710 vaccine against S. aureus, [… read more]

May 182013
 
Taking Apixaban (Eliquis) after completing Coumadin prevents recurrent DVT/PE

Apixaban (Eliquis) Prevents Recurrent DVT-PE Long-Term People with unprovoked venous thromboembolic disease (pulmonary embolism or deep venous thrombosis, or DVT) are at high risk for recurrence, and current ACCP guidelines advise consideration of “indefinite” anticoagulation. Warfarin (Coumadin) is a wonder drug efficacy-wise, reducing the risk of pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis by ~90%. However, [… read more]

May 162013
 
FDA approves Breo Ellipta, a new once-daily COPD inhaler treatment

FDA Approves Breo Ellipta, Once-Daily LABA/ICS for COPD The FDA approved the new drug Breo Ellipta as a once-daily inhaled therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Breo Ellipta includes the corticosteroid fluticasone, and vilanterol — a once-daily long acting beta agonist — in a combination dry powder inhaler. This was the FDA’s first approval [… read more]

May 122013
 
Killer carbapenem-resistant bacteria spreading through LTACs

Killer Carbapenem-Resistant Bacteria Spreading Across U.S. Gut-living bacteria like Klebsiella are gaining resistance to carbapenems at an alarming rate, and long-term acute care hospitals (LTACs) and nursing homes seem to be the incubators for these killer bugs spreading across the U.S. Carbapenems  like meropenem and doripenem have been the gold standard to treat infections from [… read more]