Review Articles Archives - Page 2 of 13 - PulmCCM
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Feb 092014
 
Sedation and Analgesia in the Critically Ill (Review)

Pain, agitation, and delirium are all extremely common in ICU patients–so much so that they’ve been termed the “ICU triad.” No one knows exactly how common each is, because ICU patients are often too delirious to complain of pain; or their agitation hides their delirium; or their unidentified pain may cause their agitation; or …. [... read more]

Jan 052014
 
Acute Liver Failure: Causes & Initial Management (Part 1 of 2)

Acute Liver Failure: Causes and Initial Management See also: Treatment of Acute Liver Failure Acute liver failure, also called fulminant liver failure, has been defined as “a severe liver injury, potentially reversible in nature and with onset of hepatic encephalopathy within 8 weeks of the first symptoms in the absence of pre-existing liver disease.” Acute [... read more]

Jan 052014
 
Acute Liver Failure: Treatment (Part 2 of 2)

Acute Liver Failure: Treatment (Part 2 of 2) See also: Acute Liver Failure: Causes & Initial Management Management of acute liver failure is largely supportive critical care for the multiorgan failure that frequently results. Severe acute liver failure results in rapidly progressive hepatic encephalopathy and lethal cerebral edema; this complication requires special vigilance and expert [... read more]

Dec 082013
 
Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury Review (Part 2 of 2)

Prevention and Management of Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury See also Part 1: Mechanisms of Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury The recognition that lifesaving mechanical ventilation can also be harmful, even lethal, has led to a sea change in the use of mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients — at least in theory. For people with acute respiratory distress [... read more]

Dec 072013
 
Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury Review (Part 1 of 2)

Mechanisms of Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (Part 1) See also Part 2: Prevention and Management of Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury Although invasive mechanical ventilation saves tens of thousands of lives each year, it can also be harmful, especially when misapplied. The repetitive stretching of lung tissue during positive pressure ventilation can damage fragile alveoli already made vulnerable [... read more]

Nov 162013
 
Shock Review: Mechanisms and Therapies

Shock Review (Part 1 of 2) (See also Shock Review Part 2: Goals of Therapy) Jean-Louis Vincent, editor in chief of Critical Care, has a new review article on circulatory shock in the New England Journal of Medicine, where he’s also the editor of their new critical care section. Daniel De Backer co-authors. (See also [... read more]

Nov 162013
 
Shock Review: Goals of Therapy

Shock Review (Part 2 of 2) (See also Shock Review Part 1: Mechanisms and Therapies) Shock results from serious illness compromising either vascular muscle tone (most commonly septic shock), the heart’s function, or the volume of plasma inside blood vessels. The true goal of treatment for shock is to correct the underlying cause, but except [... read more]

Oct 242013
 
Dysphagia and swallowing disorders in the ICU (Review)

ICU-related Dysphagia and Swallowing Disorders More than 700,000 people develop respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation each year in the U.S. alone, and those that survive are at elevated risk for developing swallowing dysfunction. The aspiration syndromes that follow can be devastating, especially if not recognized and addressed early. Denver’s Madison Macht et al provide a clinical [... read more]

Oct 192013
 
Overnight intensivists unnecessary in well-staffed ICUs? (Meta-analysis)

24/7 Intensivist Coverage Does Not Improve Outcomes: Meta-Analysis The debate over whether ICUs should be staffed around the clock by intensivist physicians has simmered for more than 20 years, with opinions on both sides driven more by values and personal biases than evidence. Recent studies have confirmed the benefit of daytime intensivists in ICUs but failed [... read more]

Oct 062013
 
Mechanical ventilation in ARDS due to sepsis (Surviving Sepsis Guidelines)

Mechanical Ventilation in ARDS Due to Sepsis See All the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines Sepsis is one of the main causes of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), in which the lungs are injured by circulating inflammatory mediators, resulting in severely impaired gas exchange usually requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. ARDS also results in poor lung compliance in [... read more]

Oct 062013
 
Pulmonary rehabilitation: no benefit at one year, even with extended Rx? (Review)

Pulmonary Rehabilitation: No Benefit After 12 Months Light, Infrequent Workouts Don’t Sustain Fitness Gains Pulmonary rehabilitation (“pulmonary rehab”) is a dressed-up name for what are essentially supervised exercise programs for people living with chronic lung disease. Although pulmonary rehab programs often include multidimensional support (nutrition, education, breathing exercises and psychological counseling), it’s the exercise that produces [... read more]

Sep 282013
 
Intubation Checklists -- are theirs better than yours?

Intubation Checklists in the ICU and ED Can They Save Lives? Endotracheal intubation in the ICU or emergency department is often challenging, to understate by a lot. Intubations outside the operating room are often emergent rush jobs on crashing, hypotensive, severely hypoxemic patients, or people with who have just self-extubated. Pulmonologists’ and emergency physicians’ familiarity [... read more]

Sep 132013
 
Vasopressors for septic shock (Surviving Sepsis Guidelines)

Vasopressors for Septic Shock (Surviving Sepsis Guidelines) See All the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines Vasopressors are provided for septic shock that does not respond to fluid resuscitation. Norepinephrine (Levophed), epinephrine, vasopressin, phenylephrine (Neo-Synephrine), and dopamine are the most commonly used vasopressors for septic shock. To achieve adequate fluid resuscitation, the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines advise at least 30 ml/kg [... read more]

Sep 132013
 
Mild weight gain after quitting smoking outweighed by cessation's benefits

Weight Gain After Quitting Smoking Usually Mild, Harmless Nicotine is an anorexigen, or appetite suppressant. This “benefit” of cigarette smoking is no secret, certainly not to teenage girls, who in surveys report smoking to stay thin. Even among women smokers over age 40, more than half said they would not quit smoking if it meant they would [... read more]

Sep 022013
 
Surviving Sepsis Guidelines 2013 - Review & Update

Surviving Sepsis Guidelines 2013 Review & Update The Surviving Sepsis Campaign launched in 2002 as a collaboration between the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, with the shared goal of reducing deaths from sepsis and septic shock around the world. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign periodically publishes its Surviving [... read more]

Sep 022013
 
Surviving Sepsis Guidelines: Diagnosis of Sepsis and Septic Shock

Diagnosis of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock (from the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines) See all the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines Sepsis is defined as an infection (definite or suspected) with systemic manifestations (any 2 from a list). This definition may seem overly broad — it means that many people with colds and self-limited viral syndromes have sepsis [... read more]

Sep 022013
 
Surviving Sepsis Guidelines: Early Goal Directed Therapy, Initial Fluid Resuscitation

Initial Volume Resuscitation and EGDT for Severe Sepsis/Septic Shock See all the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines An approach including early goal directed therapy with aggressive initial fluid resuscitation has been considered a cornerstone of initial therapy for severe sepsis and septic shock, since a single-center randomized trial showed such a strategy initiated in the emergency department [... read more]

Aug 242013
 
How to diagnose asthma (Review)

Diagnosis of Asthma: Review & Update Asthma is a poorly understood disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the airways (bronchi and bronchioles). This inflammation causes periodic constriction of the airways in people with asthma, with shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing that is often worse at night or early in the morning. Asthma is thought [... read more]

Aug 162013
 
How to manage lung cancer when resection is high risk

Management of Lung Cancer in High Surgical Risk Patients By Blair Westerly, MD We all hope that surgical resection is an option for our unfortunate patients diagnosed with lung cancer.  However, as a consequence of the epidemiology of stage I non-small cell lung cancer, the standard of care, lobectomy with systematic mediastinal lymph node evaluation, [... read more]

Jun 212013
 
High-Altitude Illness: Prediction, Prevention, Treatment

Getting Sick at High Altitude: Prevention & Treatment Rapidly ascending above altitudes of 8,200 feet (2,500 meters) from lower elevations can result in illness ranging from mild nausea and headaches, to life-threatening edema of the lungs or brain. Truth is, there is little data to help physicians prevent or treat high-altitude illnesses, or to counsel [... read more]