Policy, Ethics, Education Archives - Page 2 of 9 - PulmCCM
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Policy, Ethics, Education Articles

Oct 162013
 
Spiriva Respimat inhaler as safe as HandiHaler (TIOSPIR)

Tiotropium: Safe In Either Form Tiotropium (Spiriva) comes in two devices: the Respimat in Europe delivers a mist, while the Handihaler in the U.S. delivers a dry powder. The Respimat has been bronchodilating under a dark cloud in Europe for the past 2 years, since a BMJ meta-analysis suggested there was a 52% increased risk of [... read more]

Oct 062013
 
Pulmonary rehabilitation: no benefit at one year, even with extended Rx? (Review)

Pulmonary Rehabilitation: No Benefit After 12 Months Light, Infrequent Workouts Don’t Sustain Fitness Gains Pulmonary rehabilitation (“pulmonary rehab”) is a dressed-up name for what are essentially supervised exercise programs for people living with chronic lung disease. Although pulmonary rehab programs often include multidimensional support (nutrition, education, breathing exercises and psychological counseling), it’s the exercise that produces [... read more]

Sep 282013
 
Intubation Checklists -- are theirs better than yours?

Intubation Checklists in the ICU and ED Can They Save Lives? Endotracheal intubation in the ICU or emergency department is often challenging, to understate by a lot. Intubations outside the operating room are often emergent rush jobs on crashing, hypotensive, severely hypoxemic patients, or people with who have just self-extubated. Pulmonologists’ and emergency physicians’ familiarity [... read more]

Sep 222013
 
E-cigarettes prove effective for smoking cessation

E-Cigarettes Shown Effective as Smoking Cessation Aids Electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes use battery power to vaporize a solution, usually containing nicotine dissolved in propylene glycol, glycerin, or polyethylene glycol, creating a puff of “smoke” that dissipates harmlessly. E-cigarettes deliver a hit of nicotine (about 1/4 to 1/2 that of a cigarette puff), but their vapor [... read more]

Sep 052013
 

Following “Surviving Sepsis” Guidelines Not Always the Best Care By Dr. Philippe Rola First of all, I would like to commend those involved in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign’s Guidelines. It is a tremendous endeavour that, without a doubt, has heightened awareness and their growing implementation has and will save many lives. I would, however, also [... read more]

Aug 112013
 
USPSTF Recommends Lung Cancer Screening CT; Obamacare Pays

USPSTF Endorses Lung Cancer Screening CT; New Standard of Care Begins Lung cancer screening CT took its most important step toward widespread implementation last week, when the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released a draft of its forthcoming recommendation that the 9 million U.S. people meeting entry criteria for the National Lung Screening Trial [... read more]

Jul 192013
 
Intensivists overnight in the ICU don't help, if you're already good

Nighttime Intensivist Staffing Does Not Help (Again) As I’ve said before, probably past the point of being annoying, we intensivists perform a vital service for humanity — just ask us. Numerous studies have concluded that a specialized intensivist’s presence in an intensive care unit during the day saves lives and results in better use of health [... read more]

Jul 042013
 
Many people with metastatic lung cancer think radiation can cure

image: cancer.gov Patients With Metastatic Lung Cancer Often Believe Radiation Could Cure Among 384 patients with metastatic lung cancer who answered a survey, two in five expressed belief that radiation therapy was “very likely” or “somewhat likely” to cure them. Eighty percent thought radiation therapy would allow them to live longer, and only one-third admitted [... read more]

Jun 262013
 
FDA warns against use of Hetastarch in ICU

U.S. FDA Advises Against Hetastarch Use in ICU European Agency Recommends Ban It was probably only a matter of time. In the wake of large randomized trials suggesting hydroxyethyl starches (HES or hetastarch) cause kidney injury and death in critically ill patients from sepsis and other causes, and the European Medicines Agency formally suggesting this month [... read more]

Jun 162013
 
Decontaminate all incoming ICU patients to reduce infections, says RCT

“Decolonizing” New ICU Patients Reduces Bloodstream Infections: NEJM This article had an erratum posted in NEJM: read more here. In humankind’s battle against bacteria, the ICU is the front line. And with MRSA infection rates doubling in the past 5 years, and the more recent and scary spread of lethal pan-resistant Enterobacteriae, lately the bugs have [... read more]

May 232013
 
New lung cancer prediction tool promises better use of screening CT

New Prediction Model Selects Best Lung Cancer Screening Candidates In the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), screening for lung cancer with low-dose chest CT scans resulted in a 20% reduction in death from lung cancer. The consumer-serving American Lung Association recommended outright that older people with heavy smoking histories should get lung cancer screening; leading [... read more]

May 122013
 
Killer carbapenem-resistant bacteria spreading through LTACs

Killer Carbapenem-Resistant Bacteria Spreading Across U.S. Gut-living bacteria like Klebsiella are gaining resistance to carbapenems at an alarming rate, and long-term acute care hospitals (LTACs) and nursing homes seem to be the incubators for these killer bugs spreading across the U.S. Carbapenems  like meropenem and doripenem have been the gold standard to treat infections from [... read more]

May 122013
 
Allowing families to witness CPR had positive effects (RCT)

Families Allowed to Witness CPR Felt Better, Had Fewer Regrets Should family members be allowed, or even encouraged, to witness the health care team’s attempts to revive their family member with CPR after a cardiac arrest? In the interests of openness and transparency, many have argued “yes,” with the thought that witnessing the heroic efforts [... read more]

Mar 302013
 
Having a pulmonary embolism? Don't wait for the weekend

Why Patients with PEs Shouldn’t Love the Weekend Hospitals big and small struggle with weekend staffing models.  Mortality has been shown to be higher on the weekend for several common life-threatening illnesses, including CHF exacerbations, acute MI, upper GI bleeds and intracerebral hemorrhage. All these conditions are known to benefit from early intervention; however, whether [... read more]

Mar 262013
 

The following is a guest post from Dr. Jonathan Weiss; the views expressed are his own. Submit your own guest post to PulmCCM, and be heard by thousands of your colleagues.  Maintenance of Certification: Good or Bad? Dear Colleagues, A short history lesson: For years, physicians, upon completing a residency or fellowship, went through a [... read more]

Mar 212013
 
Big Tobacco win: Feds to take breather in fight for scary cigarette labeling

Feds to Big Tobacco on Cigarette Labeling Fight: “Uncle!” The feds are admitting defeat for now in their fight for graphic, negative imagery to be displayed on all cigarette packaging and advertisements. Attorney General Eric Holder announced yesterday that the Justice Department will not ask the Supreme Court to reverse their loss in a federal [... read more]

Mar 172013
 
FDA warns of sudden cardiac death with use of azithromycin

FDA Warns of Sudden Cardiac Death Risk from Azithromycin Last summer, PulmCCM reported on a New England Journal paper suggesting an increased risk of sudden cardiac death in patients taking even a short 5-day course of azithromycin. Yesterday, the FDA expressed its official concern in a Drug Safety Communication and statement to the press on [... read more]

Feb 272013
 
Knowing When, When Knowing Is Impossible (Paul McLean)

Knowing When, When Knowing Is Impossible By Paul C. McLean The child was her first, and there were complications and aggressive therapies from the start and for months. She was unaware that the medical team was coming to believe the baby would not survive, that aggressive treatments no longer served a therapeutic purpose and were [... read more]

Feb 212013
 
Intubation in pre-hospital cardiac arrest strongly associated with worse outcomes

Intubation for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest May Harm, Not Help by Blair Westerly, MD Out of hospital cardiac arrest is a major public-health problem, and despite advances in care, survival is still low. Improved survival has been associated with early CPR, rapid defibrillation, and integrated post cardiac arrest care, but pre-hospital “advanced airway management” (i.e., intubation [... read more]