JAMA Archives - Page 3 of 4 - PulmCCM
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JAMA Articles

May 022012
 
Cost shifting of asthma meds to patients had little effect on adherence, outcomes (JAMA)

(image: flickrCC) Health insurance plans are shifting an increasing portion of costs for prescription medications onto patients. A recent study in JAMA concluded that such cost shifting decreased asthma medication use and increased hospitalization rates in U.S. children. But the effect, if real, was small. What They Did Pinar Karaca-Mandic et al looked back at [... read more]

Mar 252012
 

“The average length of medical training could be reduced by about 30% without compromising physician competence or quality of care,” writes Ezekiel Emanuel, Obama’s former health care advisor who’s now back at University of Pennsylvania in a big-thinker job spanning ethics, economics and medicine. In a JAMA essay with co-author Viktor Fuchs, they opine that [... read more]

Mar 192012
 

This post was featured on KevinMD.com; an excerpt follows: An essay in JAMA by Vinay Prasad (Northwestern of Chicago), Adam Cifu (U. of Chicago) and John Ioannidis (Stanford) should be required reading for every medical student, resident, and to pass every board certification exam in any specialty. In my humble opinion. John Ioannidis became one [... read more]

Feb 272012
 

“Medical identity theft” — theft of your unique identifiers to perpetrate Medicare or insurance fraud — may be on the rise, according to the Federal Trade Commission. There were 12,000 cases of medical identity theft reported by patients or doctors between 2007-2009. A JAMA article by Shantanu Agrawal and Peter Budetti describes one hapless victim’s [... read more]

Feb 212012
 
Amoxicillin speeds resolution of acute sinus infections, but imperceptibly? (RCT, JAMA)

Amoxicillin may hasten the recovery from acute sinusitis (sinus infections), with more patients feeling just a tiny bit better after a week of amoxicillin compared to placebo, according to a clinical trial published in the February 15 JAMA. After 10 days, those taking placebo felt as well as those taking antibiotics. You may have heard [... read more]

Feb 062012
 

Januel et al report findings of a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the total incidence of acute symptomatic venous thromboembolism (symptomatic DVT or pulmonary embolism) among patients receiving proper thromboprophylaxis after hip or knee replacements. They came up with rates of 1.1% after knee replacements, and 0.5% after hip replacements. The rate of pulmonary [... read more]

Jan 212012
 

People who survive the initial hyperinflammatory “cytokine storm” of severe sepsis regain their blood pressure, but are at high risk for secondary infection and viral reactivation. Animal models strongly suggest sepsis-induced immune suppression occurring later in the course of sepsis is to blame, but that’s never been proven in humans. Jonathan Boomer, Kathleen To, Richard [... read more]

Jan 072012
 
Sleepy cops abound; you won't like them when they're angry (JAMA, NYT)

Did you ever wonder what that police officer is really doing while you wait forever in your car for him to write you your ticket? According to new research, it’s possible he’s taking a quick nap. And you’d best save your snarky comment when he brings you the citation: sleepy cops, it turns out, tend to be [... read more]

Jan 012012
 

Numerous small (n~100), single-center randomized trials have shown a benefit of omega-3 fatty acids in acute lung injury and ARDS (reduced mortality, length of stay, and organ failure; improved oxygenation and respiratory mechanics). A meta-analysis combining these studies suggested a stat.significant benefit in mortality (risk ratio 0.67), ventilator requirement (-5 days), and ICU stay (-4 [... read more]

Jan 012012
 

The National Lung Screening Trial demonstrated annual screening with chest CT saves one life per 320 screened compared to yearly screening with chest radiography. However, there was no “usual care” group (no screening at all) to compare against. Oken et al report additional results from the PLCO Trial (Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening [... read more]

Jan 012012
 

Severe sepsis makes the heart irritable, probably due to all the evil humors and increased cardiac demand. Between 6-20% of patients with severe sepsis develop atrial fibrillation for the first time; that’s old news. What’s been unclear is what new-onset atrial fibrillation in severe sepsis means: is it an expected, yeah-so-what marker of critical illness, [... read more]

Dec 262011
 

Medications are often stopped during transfers of care. Bell et al analyzed administrative-level data for almost 400,000 hospitalizations in Ontario, Canada, as well as 90-day follow-up outpatient prescription data. They conclude that medications were likely to be discontinued after discharge from the hospital or ICU, “potentially unintentionally.” Five medication classes were analyzed (inhalers, anticoagulant/antiplatelets, acid-suppressors, thyroxine [... read more]

Dec 262011
 

The Institute of Medicine has issued stern new guidelines on guideline development. Apparently a good portion of the 2,700 clinical practice guidelines in the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality’s database are not based on a foundation of good evidence, do not acknowledge when the evidence is shaky, and their authors often have financial conflicts [... read more]

Dec 222011
 

Neither a large 2009 multicenter study nor a 2011 meta-analysis showed any clinical benefit from the use of ICU telemedicine. Lilly et al report the results of a large single-center study in which they progressively implemented ICU telemedicine among 6,290 patients in 7 ICUs (a stepped-wedge design), with non-telemedicine groups acting as controls at each [... read more]

Nov 252011
 

According to compelling new data, you can win the genetic lottery and live healthy all your life, and you’ll still be more likely to die from your first heart attack than the diabetic guy in the next bed who keeps going outside to smoke to relieve his chest pain. But you’ll at least have had more time [... read more]

Nov 012011
 

The 2009 randomized CESAR trial in Lancet concluded that in severe ARDS in the U.K., referral to an ECMO center saved lives. However, patients in the control (non-ECMO) group didn’t consistently get low-tidal ventilation, and many patients randomized to ECMO never received it, creating skepticism of the findings. A case series from Australia/New Zealand (ANZ ECMO) in JAMA showed a 70% survival [... read more]

Oct 292011
 

While we were screening our heavy smokers for lung cancer with chest CTs, the Dutch and Belgians have been screening their own (in the NELSON trial, which will report results in 2015). They double-dipped their imaging data here to ask the question, how good is chest CT at identifying undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease? 1,140 [... read more]

Oct 112011
 

In 2006, Medicare (we) spent 25% of our dollars on treatment for people in their last year of life. The debate rages, waged with euphemism in public and painful, conflicting emotions in private: how can we let Grandma go peacefully and with dignity, without feeling too guilty or ending up in front of a Senate subcommittee? [... read more]

Sep 132011
 

West et al report survey and in-service exam data from 16,394 internal medicine residents nationwide, 2008-2009. Almost 15% reported that their lives “suck” or “profoundly suck” (I’m paraphrasing slightly). About half reported emotional exhaustion or feeling burned-out. Almost 30% were in a disconnected, fugue-like state. The really depressed ones did worse on their in-service exams, [... read more]