Infectious Disease and Sepsis Archives - PulmCCM

Infectious Disease and Sepsis Articles

Oct 142016
Piperacillin-Tazobactam: The Antibiotic You’re Not Administering Correctly

“Half of the time we’re gone but we don’t know where, and we don’t know where …” -Paul Simon The Case A 42 year old man is admitted with fever, right upper-quadrant pain and jaundice.  Over the last few hours he has become progressively confused and hypotensive.  He has normal renal function with adequate urine [… read more]

Sep 252016
Sepsis-Associated AKI – Bellomo Kidney – Implications for Management

“Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth.” -Thoreau The Case A 56 year old man with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy [LVEF 40% and mitral regurgitation] is admitted with severe sepsis due to appendicitis.  One month prior to admission, his outpatient cardiologist saw him and noted a dry weight of 88 kg.  On admission to the [… read more]

Aug 262016
Rising Lactate & the Art of Venous Blood Gas Interpretation

A 23 year old woman is admitted with severe abdominal pain following 5 days of profound non-bloody diarrhea and 72 hours of recalcitrant non-bloody emesis.  She has lost 7 pounds in this time frame and has been unable to maintain oral hydration.  Her eyes are sunken and her vital signs are notable for a heart [… read more]

Jul 302016
IDSA Guidelines 2016: HAP, VAP & It’s the End of HCAP as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)

“It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients.  They are not intended to supplant physician judgement with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations.” -IDSA/ATS Guidelines 2016 A 73 year old man is admitted from a nursing home for an NSTEMI and is treated on the telemetry [… read more]

May 282016
The Cerebral Circulation and Sepsis-Associated Delirium

The Journal of Intensive Care has newly published a series of sepsis-related organ dysfunction reviews.  Additionally, a comprehensive yet concise overview of the cerebral circulation was just disseminated.  This summary draws on both of these terrific primary resources as a point-of-departure for discussion of sepsis-associated delirium [SAD]. Cerebral blood flow [CBF] ultimately depends on 1. the [… read more]

Mar 012016
An Expected or Maladaptive Response to Infection?  Sepsis Reconsidered

“A man may take to drink because he feels himself to be a failure, and then fail all the more completely because he drinks … English … becomes ugly and inaccurate because our thoughts are foolish, but the slovenliness of our language makes it easier for us to have foolish thoughts.” George Orwell reminds us [… read more]

Jan 172016
Review: Lactate & Sepsis

On this snowy, Stockholm Sunday, I look out from my quarters on the Mälardrottningen across the still, icy waters and I think about a cirrhotic patient for whom I recently cared.  She presented with significant dyspnea as she had stopped taking her diuretics.  Instead, she was using excessive doses of her friend’s albuterol inhaler to treat [… read more]

Aug 252015
Are central lines really needed for vasopressor infusions?

image: Wikipedia There’s only one sure way to prevent complications from a central line: don’t place one. Like many invasive interventions, some of central venous catheters’ indications have been called into question in recent years. Monitoring of central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation via central IV access — once considered essential to good care [… read more]

May 272015
High flow oxygen by nasal cannula saves lives over noninvasive ventilation

Image: F&P Healthcare Noninvasive ventilation (NIV), often referred to by the trade name “BiPAP®,” can prevent intubation and save lives in patients with COPD exacerbations or pulmonary edema due to heart failure. Its proven benefits and low risk have led to NIV being used for patients in respiratory failure in virtually every acute care setting [… read more]

May 172015
SICU Basic Training (Video, Part 1)

Dr. Richard Savel, director of the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) at Maimonides Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine contributes this excellent educational video. Designed for an audience of SICU house staff, its content is applicable to non-surgical critically ill patients as well. Topics presented include shock; sepsis bundles; acid base status; metabolic acidosis; metabolic alkalosis; [… read more]

May 172015
The only VAP prevention method that saves lives is the one you’re not using

There’s always been doubt about the efficacy of the numerous “ventilator bundles” hospitals use to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). A provocative new analysis concludes that none of these methods save lives — except the one that almost no ICUs are using today. Healthcare associated pneumonias (HAP), especially ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAP), are associated with increased mortality, excess antibiotic use, lengthened hospital [… read more]

Apr 122015
Antibiotics for community-acquired pneumonia: Is azithromycin out?

Is it time for a change in the standard treatment of community-acquired pneumonia? A new Dutch study says, maybe. The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) says, not so fast. IDSA’s guidelines for treatment of community acquired pneumonia were last updated in 2007. For patients admitted to the hospital but not needing the ICU, they have [… read more]

Mar 282015
Surviving Sepsis Says EGDT Not Needed in All Patients with Septic Shock

As regular PulmCCM readers know, the ProCESS, ARISE and ProMISe randomized trials showed no benefit of protocolized early goal-directed therapy as compared to usual conscientious care in the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. In response to ProCESS and ARISE, the influential Surviving Sepsis Campaign now advises that measurement of central venous pressure (CVP) and [… read more]

Mar 202015
ProMISe Trial for Sepsis: Usual Care 3, Goal-Directed Therapy 0*

* (since 2014) The ARISE (Australasia) and ProCESS (U.S.) trials, published in 2014, each demonstrated no advantage of protocolized care for sepsis over conscientious usual care. For those remaining unconvinced, the U.K.-based ProMISe trial is available in the New England Journal of Medicine. ProMISe extends the growing global footprint of what some will call the [… read more]

Mar 062015
Chlorhexidine baths in ICU don't prevent infections in large trial

Throwing the Baby out with the (Chlorhexidine) Bathwater? New Data on Disinfectant Baths By Lekshmi Santhosh, MD As a critical care community, we’ve been forever searching for a magic bullet to eradicate healthcare-acquired infections. So when the pair of 2013 NEJM trials on daily chlorhexidine bathing showed statistically significant reductions on the incidence of hospital-acquired [… read more]

Feb 122015
FDA approves ceftolozane/tazobactam (Zerbaxa); 4th new antibiotic in 2014

The U.S. FDA continued its flurry of new antibiotic approvals to close out 2014, giving the nod to ceftolozane with tazobactam. The drug will be marketed as Zerbaxa by the pharmaceutical company Cubist. Ceftolozane is a novel cephalosporin, combined with the existing β-lactamase inhibitor tazobactam in the new product. Zerbaxa has broad activity against gram-negative [… read more]

Jan 192015
Subglottic suctioning prevents ventilator-associated pneumonia

Subglottic suctioning can prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), but much of the research showing its benefits was performed prior to wide adoption of the so-called “VAP bundle,” widely believed to reduce VAP incidence. This led some to question any additive benefits of subglottic suctioning. Authors of a new randomized trial found that subglottic suctioning also reduced ventilator-associated pneumonia incidence in a [… read more]

Oct 312014
Life after sepsis protocols: What now? (You decide.)

2014 has been a rough year for advocates of sepsis protocols. First, the long-awaited ProCESS trial did not show any benefit from use of the original early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) protocol used in the single-center 2001 trial by Rivers et al that, despite criticism, became the standard of care for the following decade. Patients cared for in the 2 non-EGDT arms [… read more]

Oct 142014
Total parenteral nutrition vs enteral nutrition: no difference in critically ill? (CALORIES trial)

Feeding patients enterally (nasogastric or nasojejunal tube feedings) has been the standard of care for critically ill patients, based on weak evidence that it reduces infection rates; hence the adage “feed the gut, if you can.” That last caveat is included because so many critically ill patients have gastric motility impairment (with inability to achieve [… read more]