Free Full Text Archives - Page 3 of 7 - PulmCCM
Advertisement


Free Full Text Articles

Jul 092012
 
Meropenem + moxifloxacin: no improvement over meropenem alone in severe sepsis (RCT)

In the first randomized trial of its kind, patients with severe sepsis or septic shock who were given meropenem alone had equivalent clinical outcomes to patients who were given combination therapy including meropenem and moxifloxacin. The results, reported in JAMA, provide ethical support to critical care physicians who prefer to be conservative antibiotic stewards. But [... read more]

Jul 032012
 
Dynamic extrathoracic airway obstruction

For a great video example of dynamic extra-thoracic airway obstruction, click the below link to the July 5, 2012 New England Journal of Medicine. This 53-year-old woman had a traumatic laryngeal fracture as a child, and presented with daytime somnolence and inspiratory stridor. On laryngoscopy, she had proliferation of the mucosa over the vocal cords, [... read more]

Jun 272012
 
Pertussis underdiagnosed; adult booster-vaccine prevents "whoop" & infant deaths

This gentleman (not pictured in the photo) graciously allowed himself to be videotaped in the midst of a severe whooping cough episode caused by Bordetella pertussis; the video is posted on the New England Journal’s website. He had not been vaccinated: vaccination during childhood greatly reduces the risk of severe or life-threatening pertussis infection, and reduces [... read more]

Jun 232012
 
Acupuncture improved COPD in a "real" randomized trial

Acupuncture has danced on the fringes of mainstream Western medical therapy for decades. Acupuncture has been shown to improve numerous conditions –for example, reducing dyspnea in patients with cancer, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a few randomized trials. But — unsurprisingly, given complementary medicine’s lack of funding and acceptance among traditional academics — [... read more]

Jun 142012
 
Most clinical trials are too small, often underpowered

The past decade has seen an explosion in the number of clinical trials; there are now more than 10,000 new trials registered each year. Although clinical trials’ quality is improving somewhat, most are still small and single-center and a large proportion do not adhere with reporting requirements, raising serious questions as to what we are [... read more]

Jun 132012
 
No increased risk detected from smoking cessation just before surgery

Remember that weird advice we were taught as physicians-in-training to give to smoking patients before an upcoming surgery? “You should quit smoking, but not within the 2 weeks just before your surgery.” (It sounds off-key to me even as I write it now.) Based on … what? Some medical lore passed down from a decades-old study [... read more]

May 242012
 
U.S. Gov't purse strings may be tightening on GME programs

(image: arstechnica) The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services fund graduate medical education (GME) in the U.S. through payroll taxes — to the tune of $9.5 billion per year. Only a portion of that actually goes to paying house staff salaries, though. The rest, academic medical centers have traditionally been free to spend more or [... read more]

May 132012
 
Chantix: no excess cardiovascular risk in new meta-analysis (BMJ)

(image: People’s Pharmacy) Sure to re-light controversy around Pfizer’s varenicline (Chantix): a new study concludes the smoking cessation drug likely carries no increased risk for cardiovascular events.  Judith Prochaska and Joan Hilton (University of California – San Francisco) report the results in the May 4 BMJ. Sonal Singh (Johns Hopkins) et al’s previous meta-analysis, reported in CMAJ [... read more]

May 112012
 
Acetaminophen causes childhood asthma, researcher argues

(image: flickrCC) Is acetaminophen responsible for the worldwide rise in childhood asthma over the past 30 years? Citing a mounting pile of circumstantial evidence from epidemiologic observational studies, John McBride of Akron’s Children’s Hospital in Ohio believes so, and that it’s time to officially push the worry button. The theory is that the fear of aspirin-induced [... read more]

Apr 202012
 
Texting resident fails to stop warfarin; hemopericardium ensues

Texting while doctoring is a newly hyped threat to patient safety. Multitasking and the constant flow of new distracting information in the form of alarms, interruptions, pages, etc. have always been inherent to the practice of medicine. But some are wondering if the ubiquitous temptations of personal social media-enabled smartphones and tablets in the medical [... read more]

Apr 142012
 
NYU's Clinical Correlations: a great internal medicine review

We have our hands full at PulmCCM Central just keeping up with the best published literature in pulmonary and critical care medicine. Somehow, the folks at NYU manage to vet the much larger volume of literature published in internal medicine, and offer it in a user-friendly review in their Clinical Correlations blog. Clinical Correlations is [... read more]

Apr 052012
 

The Joint Commission (previously called “JCAHO”) launched its new “Tobacco Cessation Performance Measure Set” on January 1, 2012. Like most New Years’ resolutions, we all promptly ignored it. But it’s time to pay attention — your hospital might be. Wasn’t there already a smoking cessation performance measure? Yes, in 2004 hospitals were required to report the proportion [... read more]

Mar 222012
 

Mazen Albeldawi and Rohit Makkar of the Cleveland Clinic bring us a free image in the New England Journal of what the bronchial tree looks like when a barium swallow test goes horribly awry. This patient had a very poor outcome, particularly unfortunate since this was an elective test. The New England Journal also ran a previous [... read more]

Mar 182012
 

Sleep docs don’t come off looking so hot in this recent NPR story, which paints some of them as opportunistic plunderers of the nation’s health care dollars, over-ordering expensive sleep studies to make a buck. As reporter Jenny Gold points out, the number of sleep studies performed in the U.S. has quadrupled over the past [... read more]

Mar 072012
 

When someone with a pneumothorax lies supine — as in the 23-year old man described in this New England Journal mini-case from Saweera Sabbar and Eric James Nilles of Rashid Trauma Center in Dubai, UAE — air rises laterally and caudally, and creates displacement downward and medially of the hemidiaphragm, displaying as the “deep sulcus [... read more]

Feb 232012
 
For most, plane flights add no DVT/PE risk (just stretch your legs)

As we were all taught in med school, long-distance flights, or even a long car trip, greatly increase your risk for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism … right? (I feel like I’ve answered about 8 board questions featuring this scenario.) The CDC even has a whole page of guidelines detailing the travel-DVT-risk-connection and the [... read more]

Feb 192012
 

Traditional bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsy (TBBx) has only a 34% sensitivity at diagnosing peripheral pulmonary nodules < 2 cm in size. Transthoracic needle aspiration (TTNA)’s superior sensitivity of 90% for diagnosing peripheral lesions makes it the standard of care for peripheral lesions, but TTNA carries a considerable risk for pneumothorax. A huge proportion of patients experience [... read more]

Feb 172012
 
Tobacco warnings, free speech, and "in-activist" judges (NEJM)

Legal eagle Kevin Outterson explains the latest twists in the saga of the FDA’s quest to get large, scary pictures on every cigarette package under its new regulatory muscle of the 2009 Obama-authorized Tobacco Control Act. R.J. Reynolds sued, and federal judge Richard Leon took their side in November 2011, deciding to apply the more [... read more]