Crit Care Med (journal) Archives - PulmCCM
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Crit Care Med (journal) Articles

Feb 232014
 
Critical Care Roundup: Issue #1

Welcome to issue #1 of the Critical Care Roundup, a new occasional feature on PulmCCM. Here we’ll touch briefly on all the interesting stuff there wasn’t time to thoroughly review. Got a study that should go in the next roundup? Post a link in the comments or by emailing [email protected] Or, browse all the PulmCCM [… read more]

Feb 222014
 
Epitaph for nitric oxide for ARDS

Image: Dartmouth Nitric Oxide: No Benefit Even in Severe ARDS Giving inhaled nitric oxide to people with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) improves oxygenation, but has never been demonstrated to improve survival. Not many physicians seem to use nitric oxide for ARDS anymore, except possibly as salvage therapy in life-threatening refractory disease. Even that well-meaning [… read more]

Oct 242013
 
Dysphagia and swallowing disorders in the ICU (Review)

ICU-related Dysphagia and Swallowing Disorders More than 700,000 people develop respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation each year in the U.S. alone, and those that survive are at elevated risk for developing swallowing dysfunction. The aspiration syndromes that follow can be devastating, especially if not recognized and addressed early. Denver’s Madison Macht et al provide a clinical [… read more]

Oct 192013
 
Overnight intensivists unnecessary in well-staffed ICUs? (Meta-analysis)

24/7 Intensivist Coverage Does Not Improve Outcomes: Meta-Analysis The debate over whether ICUs should be staffed around the clock by intensivist physicians has simmered for more than 20 years, with opinions on both sides driven more by values and personal biases than evidence. Recent studies have confirmed the benefit of daytime intensivists in ICUs but failed [… read more]

Oct 062013
 
Mechanical ventilation in ARDS due to sepsis (Surviving Sepsis Guidelines)

Mechanical Ventilation in ARDS Due to Sepsis See All the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines Sepsis is one of the main causes of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), in which the lungs are injured by circulating inflammatory mediators, resulting in severely impaired gas exchange usually requiring invasive mechanical ventilation. ARDS also results in poor lung compliance in [… read more]

Sep 022013
 
Surviving Sepsis Guidelines 2013 - Review & Update

Surviving Sepsis Guidelines 2013 Review & Update The Surviving Sepsis Campaign launched in 2002 as a collaboration between the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, with the shared goal of reducing deaths from sepsis and septic shock around the world. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign periodically publishes its Surviving [… read more]

Sep 022013
 
Surviving Sepsis Guidelines: Initial Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Therapy

Initial Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Therapy in Severe Sepsis/Septic Shock For Sepsis, Use the Right Antibiotics at the Right Time (= As Early As Possible) See all the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines  The short version: Give appropriate and effective antibiotics as early as possible for patients known or suspected to be in severe sepsis or septic shock. [… read more]

Jun 162013
 

By Dr. Philippe Rola I was recently scanning the literature in preparation for our symposium, and came across what should have been a 2003 instead of a 2013 publication in the March issue of the CCM Journal, entitled “Point-of-Care Ultrasound to estimate Central Venous Pressure:  A Comparison of Three Techniques.” I have to admit this [… read more]

Apr 112013
 
Obesity may improve survival in ARDS, but with renal failure

In ARDS, Obesity May Protect Life (But Not Kidneys) by Blair Westerly, MD Obesity is an epidemic and common in intensive care units in the United States.  Furthermore, while acute kidney injury (AKI) is also common in critically ill patients, obese patients carry additional risk for AKI because of increased baseline comorbidities. Both obesity and [… read more]

Jan 312013
 
Etomidate associated with increased mortality in sepsis: meta-analysis

Etomidate: Unsafe for Intubation in Patients with Sepsis? by Blair Westerly, MD Etomidate is commonly used for rapid sequence intubation; however, even after one dose, it has been associated with adrenal axis suppression in critically ill patients. Though both adrenal insufficiency and increased mortality in sepsis have been associated with etomidate, the relationship of the [… read more]

Jan 042013
 
Femoral lines might not be so bad after all for infection risk

“We’ve got to get that femoral line out of there!” The attending’s face as he says it shadowed with a simmer of fear, a dash of anger. How could the moonlighter have been so incompetent or lazy as to choose the benighted femoral site for a central venous line when the internal jugular and subclavian [… read more]

Dec 272012
 
Surviving Sepsis Guidelines Updated: Preview from SCCM Meeting

More: Surviving Sepsis Guidelines Review / Update The Surviving Sepsis Campaign is a collaboration between the U.S. Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, and the International Sepsis Forum, whose recommendations on the management of sepsis are considered widely. At the 2012 SCCM meeting, the Surviving Sepsis committee revealed [… read more]

Oct 042012
 
Post-pyloric feeding no better than usual NG tube in vented patients (RCT)

Image: EIMJM.com Evidence-based practice guidelines adopted by critical care societies in Canada, Germany, Australia and New Zealand recommend starting enteral nutrition for critical illness shortly after admission to an ICU. In observational studies, critically ill adults get only about 50-70% their caloric goals from enteral feeding; reduced gastric motility is often responsible for the limited [… read more]

Jul 152012
 
Superior Vena Cava Syndrome Review

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome: A Cancer-Related Medical Emergency (More PulmCCM Topic Updates) Multiple cancers are expected to rise in prevalence in the U.S. over the coming decades, and so is the risk for cancer-related medical emergencies. For a few, superior vena cava syndrome (SVC syndrome) will be the first manifestation of their cancer. It’s important [… read more]

Jul 082012
 
Cancer-Related Medical Emergencies: Tumor Lysis Syndrome

Cancer-Related Medical Emergencies: Acute Tumor Lysis Syndrome (More PulmCCM Topic Updates) The prevalence of multiple cancers are expected to rise in the United States over the coming decades. Despite improved survival with some cancers, some people with malignancy will develop cancer related emergencies; for a few, this will be the first manifestation of their cancer. [… read more]

Jul 072012
 
GM-CSF (Leukine) for acute lung injury & ARDS (RCT)

Human recombinant granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF or Leukine) did not reduce ventilator-days in patients with acute lung injury / ARDS in a randomized trial published in the January 2012 Critical Care Medicine. Why would it have? Interestingly, patients with ARDS with higher levels of GM-CSF in their BAL fluid are more likely to survive. GM-CSF maintains [… read more]

Jul 042012
 
Blood pressure cuffs vs arterial lines for hypotensive patients

If you and your team just can’t get an arterial line into your critically ill, hypotensive patient for continuous invasive blood pressure measurement, you may be somewhat comforted by the findings of Karim Lakhal, Christine Macq, Xavier Capdevila et al in the April 2012 Critical Care Medicine. They found that among 150 critically ill patients [… read more]

May 232012
 
For some LTAC patients, pessimism is the new kindness

(image: flickrCC) Half of patients transferred to long-term acute care facilities (LTACs) on prolonged mechanical ventilation will die within a year, according to a 2010 review. Only a small minority will ever go home without needing significant caregiver assistance. For those over age 65, the prognosis is even worse. It seems rude, or even cruel, [… read more]

May 172012
 
Where's the respect (and $$) for critical care research?

(image: Suburban Wino) Craig Coopersmith of Emory is an amazing guy and a prolific investigator in critical care — and it looks like he’s fed up with having his grants rejected. After some epic bean-counting, his group concludes that critical care research gets short shrift in federal research funding, compared to the huge amounts spent [… read more]

May 092012
 
Do you have cooties? MDR-bug transmission rates in ICUs (Crit Care Med)

(image: flickrCC) Foam in, foam out, gown on, gown off … ah, the tedium of practicing critical care medicine in the age of rampant, lethal, multi-drug resistant bacteria. As a reminder to keep your guard up and your gear on, here’s a yucky study from Daniel Morgan, Elizabeth Rogawski, and Anthony Harris of the University [… read more]